THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

THE GOAL FOR 2018: 200 MOVIES WATCHED BY MIDNIGHT NEW YEAR'S EVE!  (AFTER TOPPING OUT AT 194 in 2017)

CAN HE DO IT?

​​THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

THE PURGE: ELECTION YEAR (2016)


Despite my feelings that the Purge movies have run their course, there’s no sign of the series going away anytime soon. There’s another one due in 2018. And there’s a TV show on the horizon that will focus more on the 364 days when the Purge isn’t going on. For those of you unaware, “The Purge” is a policy enacted by the “New Founding Fathers” that has made the wealthy even wealthier! Every March 22nd for 12 hours there are no laws, plain and simple. You can go kill whoever you want however you want without fear of police stopping you. Total amnesty for whatever you decide you do. Bloody as hell (surprise!), it’s like a mixture of Friday the 13th carnage and A Clockwork Orange as the purgers tend to wear costumes and masks that go well with blood red. In The Purge: Election Year (released in the midst of the Trump-Clinton election campaign, surreal enough as it is and #99 on the countdown), Presidential candidate Senator Charlie Roan (Elizabeth Mitchell) is running for President on an anti-purge platform. Her opponent and his backers (those “New Founding Fathers” again) are concerned that she may actually win. So the exemption for government is lifted – so they can assassinate her on Purge Night. Of course she insists on sheltering in her home, not in some super protected fortress, because the people can’t see her running away, as they sure can’t. Of course, there are traitors in her Secret Service division and before she can even strap on her bulletproof vest, she and private security chief Frank Grillo (much ballsier in the second Purge film) are running for their lives. Their flight intersects with a storekeeper (Mykelti Williamson) who’s guarding his deli with a shotgun across the street on a roof and several people running a triage van trying to help victims of purgers. There’s also a secret faction trying to assassinate the party candidate that they get mixed up with. I found the whole political story to be affected and unconvincing and while Williamson is tough and sympathetic, that’s about it for characterizations. With some sharper writing this might have been an interesting political story. But The Purge: Election Year goes for the easy kills, which is probably what its fanbase wants. Less thinking, more bleeding. Besides, with the current political reality, truth is much stranger than anything concocted here.

SHOULD TLA SEE THIS? If she saw the first two, she kinda already saw this.