THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

THE GOAL FOR 2018: 200 MOVIES WATCHED BY MIDNIGHT NEW YEAR'S EVE!  (AFTER TOPPING OUT AT 194 in 2017)

CAN HE DO IT?

​​THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

SUPER DARK TIMES (2017)

Super Dark Times is, as its title suggests super dark, an honest look at teenagers (and mainly teenage boys) in the 90s.  Set in the time before Columbine, debut director Kevin Phillips effectively portrays the confusion and pain of being a teenage kid (leaning closer to 18 than 13) where the most important activity is hanging out - but lacking any decent answers as to what this life thing is all about. They’re getting older and closer to a time where these kids better figure some things out pretty soon.  The combination of boredom and experimentation puts Zach (Owen Phillips) and Josh (Charlie Tahan) in a pretty desperate situation when one of their friends is accidentally killed with a sword borrowed from Zach’s Marine brother in the middle of the woods.  They plus one other kid (who goes to a different school) decide to hide the body and not tell anyone.  Soon, this terrible secret is weighing on them tremendously, screwing with their friendship and Josh’s fledging relationship with bold, pretty Allison (Elizabeth Cappuccino) and his single mom (Amy Heckerling).   Both do wonderful work here, as does director Phillips.    The dialogue is authentic and both actors make it feel like the dialogue has been stolen from a real pair of best friends.  The film goes down some uncomfortable roads, acquiring a Steven King feel by way of David Lynch until its shocking, surprising ending involving that same sword.   

Super Dark Times reminds me of River’s Edge, a similar (and excellent) 80s film where a teen strangles his girlfriend and no one who finds out about it tells the police. Both films are haunting and feature young adults with questionable moral values that will shock you.  Where did all of these kids searching for answers and ways to live their lives stumble down these paths?  See them both (not back to back or you’ll be depressed for days!). 


 
TLA one-word review: brutal