THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

THE GOAL FOR 2018: 200 MOVIES WATCHED BY MIDNIGHT NEW YEAR'S EVE!  (AFTER TOPPING OUT AT 194 in 2017)

CAN HE DO IT?

​​THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN (2017)


This movie probably doesn't get made without the anticipated commercial and critical success of the Wonder Woman movie. This film also will not share the same audience with WW (I would advise against letting the young ones see this unless you're ready to do a WHOLE lot of explaining). While Wonder Woman's origin story was fiction, what's depicted here is a true story. Luke Evans is charismatic and likable as Professor William Marston, the psychologist who created the character of Wonder Woman. He's under fire by a group called the Child Study Association about the vivid portrayals (so they say) of sadomasochistic actions (WW bound from hand to foot with her own lasso, for instance). What we find out soon enough that the prof has developed an active fantasy life with his intellectual wife and partner (Rebecca Hall, a personal favorite and as good as ever) AND grad student Olive (Bella Heathcote, also excellent). Olive has fallen in love with both of them - and they in turn, have fallen for her. The scenes of the three of them are both restrained and extremely sexy, shot beautifully by writer-director Angela Robinson. Although this is an unorthodox arrangement (the three begin living together after Olive has a baby with a cover story that she is a widow the Marstons have taken in), the trio makes us root for them to all live happily ever after. Sadly, they're caught one day by a nosy neighbor who finds them in costume and sans certain parts of clothing. Trouble starts soon after, leading to separations and sadness that would be resolved in the final reel. The strength and attributes of these two women are where Marston got his character ideas for Wonder Woman (the Child Study Association was onto something). Fascinating, study of three people in a unique relationship that, as handled by the talents behind and in front of the cameras, makes you feel their situation is natural and normal. There's a great, tense scene when the three of them are taking turns on a prototype for a lie detector (the Marstons are credited with inventing it) all are forced to admit emotions and feelings that maybe would have stayed buried. Definitely worth a rental now that it's left theaters.


TLA'S ONE WORD REVIEW: Uncoventional