THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

THE GOAL FOR 2018: 200 MOVIES WATCHED BY MIDNIGHT NEW YEAR'S EVE!  (AFTER TOPPING OUT AT 194 in 2017)

CAN HE DO IT?

​​THE WEBER MOVIE COUNTDOWN

LAST OF THE MOBILE HOT-SHOTS (1970)


 This movie is loaded with talent!  I mean James Coburn, Lynn Redgrave and Robert Hooks in an adaptation of a Tennessee Williams play, with a screenplay by Gore Vidal, and produced and directed by the great Sidney Lumet (Network, Dog Day Afternoon).  Sounds like it can’t miss, right?  Well it does – by a considerable distance.  The play it was based on, Williams’ The Seven Descents of Myrtle, only lasted 29 performances on Broadway.  I suspect at the time that if acclaimed playwright Williams had jotted down on the back of a cocktail napkin, directions to the local Texaco station, someone would have bid for the movie rights to said napkin.  This was the 15th Williams play to make it to the big screen, and this was not a lucky number indeed.  Myrtle and Jeb  are a pair of strangers who are in the audience of "The Happy Couple" TV show in New Orleans.  She persuades him to be a contestant couple and they win a bunch of kitchen appliances.  They also accept the TV host's offer to come back next week and receive a check for $3,500 to get married live on TV.   After the marriage they go back to Jeb's rundown 1840 Waverley plantation where he plans to rebuild it, as well as make a baby so there is an heir to the plantation.  That’s cause his half-brother Chicken (Robert Hooks) is living there and next in line.  And then it gets weirder and the dark comedy is just not very funny.  It’s basically a filmed stage play but very minor work by Mr. Williams.  Redgrave pulls off a decent Southern accent, so we’ll give her credit there.  But all the fine folks involved in this film cannot make it watchable.  There’s a reason you’ve never heard of this film.  Keep it that way.


TLA one word review: befuddling